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Featuring work by Joanne Mattera, Cat Crotchett, Kathleen Waterloo, Alicia LaChance, Joan Holleb, Julia Katz, Michael Hoffman, David Versluis, Rebecca Crowell, Allison B. Cooke, Lisa Pressman

This ambitious group show presents an exciting selection of artists who have each developed a unique visual vocabulary based on their history with color. The works in this exhibition derive their unique chromatic characteristics from each artist's understanding of color properties, meanings, and relationships. This understanding is married with the artists' experimental sensibilities in the studio. Shape, pattern, and occasionally imagery often provide the framework for the color investigations present in the work, but the color explorations are rarely at the mere service of description and imagery. Instead, color itself most often acts as the primary life force of this work. In addition to their attraction to saturated tonalities, these artists demonstrate a commitment to process, materiality, and the physicality of the surface. Texture plays an important role in these works, and the tactile qualities of surface, which are widely varied, work hand in hand with each composition's optical properties.



Joan Holleb

I've been playing with the subject of the forests, the light that filters through the trees, the beauty of the woods that face constant struggle against the forces of human needs and climate change. Recently I read, The Overstory, by Richard Powers. His novel is all about the impact of humanity on the trees, the old growth forests, etc. He discusses at length about how the trees have their own system of communication, for example, how they actually send out microscopic molecules to each other to send messages, to protect themselves from disease. The Forest speaks its own language. This is what I am trying to demonstrate symbolically with my work, the magic of the forest, the fact that the trees have their own language and how we must never lose sight of their beauty and the history that surrounds us in the old woods.


Joan Holleb, Sunday Drive, 36x36, oil on copper


Joan Holleb, West Wind, 41x61 image

To see more available work by this artist, contact the gallery at 312.664.3406, or email dan@addingtongallery.com

Allison B. Cooke

Every summer, Allison travels in Italy, creates from a makeshift tabletop studio and experiences the expansive nature of new environments for inspiration. This has transpired in tandem with her position as a Director and an Adjunct Professor for a summer study abroad program at the Santa Reparata International School of Art in Florence. Over the last twelve years, this immersive experience has played a major role in her artistic aesthetic and passion for aged surfaces revealing the palimpsest of time.

Allison's paintings explore transformation and its unique presence in the patinas that build up where time worn architectural structures, the human touch and atmospheric effects coalesce. She builds surfaces in both additive and subtractive processes with layered colors, and suggestive drawing/mark making in both experimental and intentional approaches.


Allison B. Cooke, Blu Atmosphere, 48x72, oil and cold wax on wood panels


Allison B. Cooke, West Wind, 40x60, oil and cold wax on wood panels

To see more available work by this artist, contact the gallery at 312.664.3406, or email dan@addingtongallery.com

Cat Crotchett

Cat's current work combines elements of pattern in fragments that together embody something different than their individual parts. They represent an intersection of information as well as ideas of cultural appropriation, assimilation, fragmentation and alteration. She focuses on visual possibilities using the interrelationships between patterns and the new identities that are formed when patterns are layered or juxtaposed. Her patterns are continually active, whether they are engaged individually or together. The end result is dynamic interaction from nuanced changes in form as patterns are established, juxtaposed & layered.


Cat Crotchett, Bow, 40x30, encaustic on panel


Cat Crotchett, Suspend, 40x30, encaustic on panel

To see more available work by this artist, contact the gallery at 312.664.3406, or email dan@addingtongallery.com

Rebecca Crowell

Rebecca Crowell has led a life focused on painting. When she is not traveling for teaching or for artist residencies (in such places as the Catalonia region of Spain, northern Sweden, and coastal areas of Ireland) she works almost daily in her studio in rural western Wisconsin. She draws significant influence from these residencies and travels, as well as from her surroundings at home. Rebecca Crowell is known for her innovative painting techniques involving cold wax medium and mixed media.


Rebecca Crowell, Chroma 3, 40x40, oil and cold wax on wood panel


Rebecca Crowell, Chroma 9, 40x40, oil and cold wax on wood panel

To see more available work by this artist, contact the gallery at 312.664.3406, or email dan@addingtongallery.com

Michael Hoffman

Michael draws on his eclectic past for inspiration. He is strongly influenced by his travels throughout Spain and France and rich colors and textures marked by time. His artwork is collected by individuals and corporations worldwide.

Says Hoffman of his work: "My paintings are meditative studies done with rich colors and bold graphic compositions. I try to create work that both captivates and calms. A common theme in my painting is the relationship between rigid linear form and the organic flow of nature. I believe inclusion of these two elements creates a certain universal harmony in many of my paintings."


Michael Hoffman, Cote d' Azure, 36x48, oil on panel


Michael Hoffman, Under a Spanish Sun, 42x42, oil on panel

To see more available work by this artist, contact the gallery at 312.664.3406, or email dan@addingtongallery.com

Julia Katz

The work in this series became a reflection on my experiences of my suburban surroundings where nature goes on around us whether we notice it or not and where nature is somewhat domesticated. Wild birds and squirrels come to our yards for free meals. Dogs are family members. Deer brazenly eat our shrubbery. When I look out at nature I almost always see some sign of human life, right angles amid the organic forms. These paintings are whimsical poems. They are ambiguous and lighthearted. They grow out of my previous work that was concerned with life and movement. They demonstrate my growing interest in formal elements of design and color, exploration of my materials, and my search for emotional expression.


Julia Katz, House is not a Home, 12x12, acrylic on panel


Julia Katz, Hilltop, 30x30, oil on panel


Julia Katz, Sun Will Shine, 30x30, oil on panel

To see more available work by this artist, contact the gallery at 312.664.3406, or email dan@addingtongallery.com

Alicia LaChance

LaChance makes large scale, process driven paintings built up through layers of acrylic, casein, latex and spray paint on a fresco-secco ground over canvas. Her mark-making involves traditional brushwork, sign maker's techniques, silk screen, taping, powdered pigment stains, scraping and sanding.

It has often been noted that LaChance's paintings feel like a form of folk art born from street culture, at once both timeless and contemporary. In the same way that skaters carve shapes from city streets Alicia fuses skateboard forms and street art sampling with a strong design and painterly sensibility. It's this mixing of experience, sensibility and technique that make these paintings so layered and powerful.

Says LaChance about her paintings: "I am always looking for the mysteries. I'm interested in the gaps. I always like to equate this process to jazz. You may be playing a series of notes, but it's the hang time, or the absence of a note, that makes you wonder. I always set out to create something that evokes that sensation and draws the viewer closer. It starts there and then it's an exploration to find what comes next."


Alicia LaChance, Street Guide 2, 24x24, mixed media on panel


Alicia LaChance, Walking City, 29x48, mixed media on panel


Alicia LaChance, Travel Guide 1, 60x48, mixed media on panel

To see more available work by this artist, contact the gallery at 312.664.3406, or email dan@addingtongallery.com

Joanne Mattera

In its entirety, my work embodies a visual synthesis of stored memory. Personal recollections, both vivid and vague, build and decompose over time. Each painting, with its complex layered surface, aims to elicit a visceral response: reshaping its own new history. Transit is the primary focus of the work. There is a direct connection between my traveling, observing the transience of images and memory. Often, my own photos captured during transport are important references that visually map the collective notion of time, travel, and place. The work begins as a personal experience; it generally ends as a more open physical act, guided by the work itself.


Joanne Mattera, Gallery Installation View, Silk Road Series, encaustic on 9 12x12 panels. Arrangement and number of panels variable.

To see more available work by this artist, contact the gallery at 312.664.3406, or email dan@addingtongallery.com

Joanne Mattera, Gallery Installation View, Silk Road Series, encaustic on 4 24x24 panels. Arrangement and number of panels variable.

To see more available work by this artist, contact the gallery at 312.664.3406, or email dan@addingtongallery.com

Lisa Pressman

In its entirety, my work embodies a visual synthesis of stored memory. Personal recollections, both vivid and vague, build and decompose over time. Each painting, with its complex layered surface, aims to elicit a visceral response: reshaping its own new history. Transit is the primary focus of the work. There is a direct connection between my travelling, observing the transience of images and memory. Often, my own photos captured during transport are important references that visually map the collective notion of time, travel, and place. The work begins as a personal experience; it generally ends as a more open physical act, guided by the work itself.


Lisa Pressman, Stop, 12x12, encaustic on panel


Lisa Pressman, Heading Center, 12x12, encaustic on panel


Lisa Pressman, Upside Down Moment, 12x12, encaustic on panel

To see more available work by this artist, contact the gallery at 312.664.3406, or email dan@addingtongallery.com

David Versluis

"My two-dimensional artworks combine representational images with abstract graphic elements that form permutations. These permutations result in images with strong visual dynamics and suggestive metaphors that signify some of the cultural complexities and responsibilities about our stewardship of the natural world. My three-dimensional artworks are transformations, which reflect the integral process of reclaiming industrial materials combined with visual impressions."

Versluis is professor emeritus of art at Dordt University. Versluis's significant contributions in displaying visual art on Dordt's campus were recognized in 2019 when he received the annual faculty / administration Noteworthy Scholarship award.


David Versluis, Primary Structure no. 2, powder-coated aluminum, 13x9x6


David Versluis, Primary Structure no. 6, powder-coated aluminum, 13.5x9x6


David Versluis, Primary Structure no. 7, powder-coated aluminum, 13.5x9x9

To see more available work by this artist, contact the gallery at 312.664.3406, or email dan@addingtongallery.com

Kathleen Waterloo

For Waterloo, process is the key that unlocks her content. Waterloo develops her very modern abstract compositions using ancient encaustic processes and techniques. Molten beeswax is combined with resin and a host of pigments. Each color is applied separately with brushes to wood panels, and a torch is continually used to fuse one layer to the next. It is this process of torch fusion that reveals the natural properties and possibilities of the wax and pigment mixture, and it's the "in-between" spaces - the places where the shapes in the painting butt against each other - that offer such beautiful, exciting visual reward. "Some artists are afraid of the fire," said Waterloo in a recent interview. "To me that's the purest way of making the work, and how I get the best results."


Kathleen Waterloo, Arabesque, 36x24, encaustic on wood panel


Kathleen Waterloo, Pipeline, 48x40, encaustic on wood panel


Kathleen Waterloo, Present Tense, 18x18, encaustic on wood panel


Kathleen Waterloo, Somersault, 40x36, encaustic on wood panel

To see more available work by this artist, contact the gallery at 312.664.3406, or email dan@addingtongallery.com



Installation photos of the exhibition













































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